Not Your Granny’s Walker

Lorak on Ravelry got in touch recently with a project and story that made me smile.

Her friend Sadie is a rad 9-year-old girl living with cerebral palsy who uses a walker to get around. Sadie happens to be an inventor, and she tricked out her walker with a set of rotating wheels that allow her to climb curbs.

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As a little gift for Sadie, Lorak mochi-fied her and gave her a walker using the pattern from my Tiny People 3 collection. Mochi Sadie doesn’t have wheels, but she’s super cool nonetheless!

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Read more about Sadie in this Boston Globe article.

Kathleen’s Snail Mail

Kathleen was slow to send birthday wishes to her sister, so she came up with an extra charming use for a tiny knit snail!
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Here’s the explanation she shared on Ravelry about the project:

I don’t like shopping for greeting cards because I can never find the right one or even one that I sort of like. I usually try to figure something out. My sister’s and her husband’s birthdays are in March, and I’m super late with my acknowledgment of their big days, so I figured that a 3-D card was in order. I think I need to make more of these. :)

To make the snail stay upright on the card, I had to sew him on. After I mounted the white cardstock onto the orange cardstock, I made two set of parallel holes with an x-acto knife, making sure they were well under the snail. Then using the body color yarn, I went up through the bottom of the card and stitched the snail to it using the holes. I tied a bow with the ends of the sewing yarn on the underside of the card in case the recipient wants to easily remove the snail. (That’s what my sister did!)

I love that people are constantly coming up with creative new things to do with tiny mochis! Stay tuned for a new contest that’s all about highlighting fun new ideas.

By the way, the tiny snail pattern is free, right here: Snails and Slugs

Projet Gnome

If you’ve taken a look at our Flickr group recently, you’ve been greeted with tiny gnomes traveling to all sorts of places—from the shore,

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to a temple,

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to a rock concert,

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to the Biosphere in Montreal (NOT Epcot, as I originally thought!),

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to Chicago,

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to Austria!

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These jet-setting gnomes were all shared by Estelle, who clearly took an epic journey with her gnome companions. In fact, there were so many traveling gnomes, as I was scrolling through the photos I was wondering just what was up…. So I got in touch with Estelle, who lives in Quebec, and I learned that this is a whole project with many different contributors!

This is what she had to say about Projet Gnome:

Last year I went on a 3 month backpacking trip with my sister to New-Zealand, Thailand and India. A few weeks before we left I was looking for ideas for small gifts to make for our future hosts, and I stumbled upon your website. I just fell in love with the gnomes and thought I’ll knit one for myself and take pictures of him at different places we go. (A bit like in the movie Amelie with Audrey Tautou)
Then I knitted a lady friend for Mr Gnome, then some more gnomes, and I started giving them to people I met on my trip so they make them travel and take pictures.
I kept on knitting gnomes when I came back home and gave them to fellow travellers. In a way I got to keep on travelling a bit this way! So far I might have knit about 30 gnomes and they travelled to more than 15 countries, thanks to the wonderful travellers/photographers/artists who took part in the Gnome Project.
For me, this is really about sharing, creating, and finding beauty and fun in small things.

How fun! Of course, Estelle’s project reminds me of Project Gnome Diplomacy, which many of you participated in last year, when I brought more than 300 of your gnomes to Seoul to be handed out to people who visited the gallery where they were displayed. I love that the gnome is a symbol of adventure and friendship that so many people recognize and want to take part in.

Anyone can join Projet Gnome by knitting a gnome and taking it on a trip, and there’s even a Facebook group for the intrepid gnomes and their escorts. I just joined myself!

You can find the tiny gnome pattern in Teeny-Tiny Mochimochi, in the Tiny Gnome Kit, and in Tiny Mochis Collection 3.

Sheila’s 100 Monkeys

How much fun are these ONE HUNDRED tiny monkeys that Sheila knitted?

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Sheila (QueenofSheeba on Ravelry) started with the Tiny Monkey pattern from Teeny-Tiny Mochimochi and added an itty-bitty mouth flap for the classic sock monkey look… 100 times over!

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I love the scenes she’s made with these little guys. Check out her Ravelry project page to zoom in and see exactly what they’re all up to.

Thank you to Sheila once again for the inspiration!

Pumpkin Butts

Saturday’s tiny pumpkin knitting class at the Harold Washington Library was lots of fun, with a great group of knitters. And after just two hours we ended up with this adorable harvest!

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When I posted this photo on Facebook, my favorite comment was from Cindy here.

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Hence the title of this blog post.

This was actually my last scheduled event for 2015, and with the baby due at the end of the year, I have NOTHING yet scheduled for 2016. It’s a strange feeling, but maybe a little nice to think about a break (I have plenty of work to do behind the scenes of course, too), and I’m sure I’ll be back out in the world before too terribly long.

Back on the subject of tiny pumpkins, Halloween is just a few days away now, isn’t it?! It’s definitely not too late for spooky little knits, so here’s a handy list of links to Halloween mochi patterns:

Candy Corn (free!)
Tiny Pumpkin
Tiny Terrors (vampire, werewolf, mad scientist, and two-headed dude)
Tiny Zombie
Thwickeds
Gobbledyghost
Boo the Bat

Also, this morning I had the nice surprise of finding my tiny terrors at the top of this BuzzFeed roundup of spooky knitting patterns by Claire de Louraille.

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The list includes quite a few adorable things I hadn’t seen before (like those cool ghost hats!), so check it out for more ideas and patterns!