How-to

How to: Inserting I-cord Arms (and other appendages)

This is a simple technique that I use in many, MANY tiny knitting patterns to make arms, legs, horns, antennae, and all other manner of tiny appendages quickly and easily. It’s ideal for any skinny shape that needs to poke straight out of a creature.

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How to: Short Rows (Wrap + Turn)

This is an intermediate knitting technique that lets you add nuanced shapes to your knittings, particularly bulges and bends! I use this technique in my tiny walrus and tiny alpaca patterns, for example.

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How to: Make a Mini Pom-Pom

Next to knitting, my favorite thing to do with yarn is pom-pom making! You can use them as cute decorations and embellishments for toys.

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How to: Picking Up Stitches

Recently I’ve received several requests for a tutorial on picking up stitches—it’s a technique that I use allll the time, so it’s about time that I show it!

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How to: Joining I-cord Legs

Many of my patterns for tiny people and other characters use the technique of joining legs together seamlessly into the piece. It’s a simple process, but one that’s best shown in a series of photos that I can’t normally fit into the space of a pattern. So here’s a tutorial on exactly how to do it.

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How to: Knitting with Double-Pointed Needles

Knitting with double-pointed needles, or DPNs, is an excellent way to knit 3-dimensional toys with minimal seaming. The needles, which are usually used 4 at a time, take a little getting used to, but it’s really less complicated that it looks! This tutorial will show you the DPN basics when knitting toys.

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How to: Cross-Stitch Basics

Cross-stitch is a super-simple craft to pick up, and that means you can dive right in and enjoy it! This tutorial will show you how to get started.

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How-to: Joining feet

I just got an email from someone who wanted some clarification on how to join the feet in the Mochimochi Reindeer pattern. It’s a very simple method, but not so simple to explain in words. Since I also use the same basic method for the Ninjabun and the Woodins patterns, it occurred to me that others might like a quick visual guide. Here goes!

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